Express press service

CHENNAI: If there’s one work by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai that even an art neophyte could recognize, it would be ‘The Great Wave’ or ‘Kanagawa oki namiura’. In fact, that’s what most of us associate with the artist. But the ukiyo-e creator has a vast collection to admire, some of which is being carefully created currently at Lalit Kala Akademi in the form of the ‘Manga Hokusai Manga’ exhibit:

Approach the collection of the master from the point of view of contemporary comics”. The exhibition is organized by the Consulate General of Japan in Chennai (The Japan Foundation) and ABK-AOTS Dosakai, Tamilnadu Center, and is one of many events planned to commemorate the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and the India. Saturday, Taga Masayuki, Consul General of Japan; G Chandramohan, President of ABK-AOTS Dosokai; Koizumi Nami, violinist; Taga Sakura, Irish harpist; and Sovan Kumar, regional secretary of Lalit Kala Akademi, inaugurated the world traveling exhibition.

On display
Featuring the works of Hokusai and other artists from different eras, the exhibit is a must-see for manga and art lovers. Not only does it feature images from all 15 volumes of Hokusai Manga (his most popular collection of sample designs in print published some 200 years ago, block-printed in black, gray, and pale flesh), but also depictions of the himself in manga, finer details of the images, as well as contemporary works specially created for the exhibition by seven artists: Ichikawa Haruko, Igarashi Daisuke, Kyo Machiko, Nishijima Daisuke, Okadaya Tetuzoh, Shiriagari Kotobuki and Yokoyama Yuichi .

“What’s unique about today’s exhibit is that it compares historical manga to contemporary manga,” the Consul General said, adding (to CE), “I also saw the exhibition for the first time today and I am impressed. Hokusai is famous; he painted beautiful ladies and mountains but he also did this kind of manga. Manga producers today know Hokusai, so there are a kind of dialogue between these painters of the past and the creators of manga of today who are influenced by them. But how much did Hokusai really influence the manga of today? The exhibition, in effect, invites the viewer to create their own notions about manga by exploring various periods and artists.

The inauguration was followed by fascinating performances of Japanese traditional and pop music by the “Sakura Namiki” duo, consisting of Koizumi and Taga. Along with the soft touches of the harp and the rich resonance of the violin, the duo also played originals written by Taga and a Studio Ghibli medley that everyone will enjoy. “(Koizumi and Taga) take the violin and harp to remote schools in Japan that often don’t have access to the instruments. They also visited nursing homes during the pandemic,” Inoue Miyuki from the Japanese Consulate General informed.

The rise of manga
Over the past few years, Japanese manga (and anime) has been growing in popularity in all countries, including India. Even shelves in Chennai are increasingly filled with volumes of My Hero Academia, Death Note, Tokyo Ghoul, and several other well-known manga. “When I was young, manga (cartoons or comics) were widely loved by children.

But today, many anime and comics have been created for older people. This is the reason why manga and animation have become so popular. I’m glad we were able to introduce Japanese manga here. Of course, we have traditional art but we can also present our culture through manga,” the Consul General told the CE.

But this is just one of many events planned by the Japan Foundation to celebrate their anniversary. Chennai residents can look forward to the upcoming Japan Expo which will showcase various aspects of Japanese culture, from performing arts to various exhibitions in November.

The exhibition is available at Lalit Kala Akademi, Greams Road, Thousand Lights until October 28 (except October 24), between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Free entry and open to all.

CHENNAI: If there’s one work by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai that even an art neophyte could recognize, it would be ‘The Great Wave’ or ‘Kanagawa oki namiura’. In fact, that’s what most of us associate with the artist. But the ukiyo-e creator has a vast collection to admire, some of which is being carefully curated currently at Lalit Kala Akademi in the form of the exhibition ‘Manga Hokusai Manga: Approaching the Master’s Compendium from the Perspective of Contemporary Comics’ . The exhibition is organized by the Consulate General of Japan in Chennai (The Japan Foundation) and ABK-AOTS Dosakai, Tamilnadu Center, and is one of many events planned to commemorate the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and the India. Saturday, Taga Masayuki, Consul General of Japan; G Chandramohan, President of ABK-AOTS Dosokai; Koizumi Nami, violinist; Taga Sakura, Irish harpist; and Sovan Kumar, regional secretary of Lalit Kala Akademi, inaugurated the world traveling exhibition. Featured Featuring the works of Hokusai and other artists from various eras, the exhibit is a must-see for manga and art lovers. Not only does it feature images from all 15 volumes of Hokusai Manga (his most popular collection of sample designs in print published some 200 years ago, block-printed in black, gray, and pale flesh), but also depictions of the himself in manga, finer details of the images, as well as contemporary works specially created for the exhibition by seven artists: Ichikawa Haruko, Igarashi Daisuke, Kyo Machiko, Nishijima Daisuke, Okadaya Tetuzoh, Shiriagari Kotobuki and Yokoyama Yuichi . “What’s unique about today’s exhibit is that it compares historical manga to contemporary manga,” the Consul General said, adding (to CE), “I also saw the exhibition for the first time today and I am impressed. Hokusai is famous; he painted beautiful ladies and mountains but he also did this kind of manga. Manga producers today know Hokusai, so there are a kind of dialogue between these painters of the past and the creators of manga of today who are influenced by them. But how much did Hokusai really influence the manga of today? The exhibition, in effect, invites the viewer to create their own notions about manga by exploring various periods and artists. The inauguration was followed by fascinating performances of Japanese traditional and pop music by the duo “Sakura Namiki”, consisting of Koizumi and Taga. the soft keys of the harp and the rich resonance of the violin, the du o also played originals written by Taga and a Studio Ghibli medley that everyone will enjoy. “(Koizumi and Taga) take the violin and harp to remote schools in Japan that often don’t have access to the instruments. They also visited nursing homes during the pandemic,” Inoue Miyuki from the Japanese Consulate General informed. The Rise of Manga In recent years, Japanese manga (and anime) has been growing in popularity in all countries, including India. Even shelves in Chennai are increasingly filled with volumes of My Hero Academia, Death Note, Tokyo Ghoul, and several other well-known manga. “When I was young, manga (the cartoons or comics) were widely loved by children. But today, many anime and comics have been created for older people. manga and animation have become so popular. I’m glad we were able to introduce Japanese manga here. Of course, we have traditional art but we can also introduce our culture through manga,” said the consul general at the CE. But this is just one of many events planned by the Japan Foundation to celebrate their anniversary. The people of Chennai can look forward to the upcoming Japan Expo which will showcase various aspects of Japanese culture, arts performing at various exhibitions in November. The exhibition is available at Lalit Kala Akademi, Greams Road, Thousand Lights until October 28 (except October 24), between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Admission is free and open at all.